Washington Naval Conference Agreements

The four-power pact, signed on December 13, 1921 by the United States, Great Britain, Japan and France, provided that all signatories would be consulted on „any question of the Pacific“ in the event of a controversy between two of them. One accompanying agreement stated that they would respect each other`s rights with respect to the different islands and mandates they held. These agreements ensured that there was a consultative framework between the United States, Britain and Japan, that is, the three major powers whose interests in the Pacific would be most likely to lead to a collision between them. But the agreements were too vague to have binding effect, and their main significance was to end the Anglo-Japanese Alliance (1902; renewed in 1911), which had previously been one of the main means of maintaining the balance of power in East Asia. Another additional document defines the „island possessions and dominions“ of Japan. . . .

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